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Analytics Digital Marketing Google Ads

Why doesn’t my Ad Spend Scale?

Proper segmentation of your Ad Campaigns is critical when measuring performance and making budget decisions. Rarely should you measure performance at the overall account level. If you want to trim the fat while capitalizing on your best opportunities, it is very important to get more granular in your analysis.

Consider this Scenario:

You spend $1,000 on a new Ad Campaign that generates $10,000 in revenue. “That’s a great ROI” you tell yourself, “Let’s double the spend!“.

When you double the budget to $2,000, your Campaign only generates $12,500 in total sales and not the $20,000 you were expecting. Why?

SpendSalesCost of SalesROAS
Ad Campaign #1$1,000$10,00010%1000%
Ad Campaign #2$2,000$12,50016%625%
Increasing spend by $1,000 only resulted in $2,500 in additional revenue: An incremental cost of sales of 40% and an incremental ROAS of 250%

Why doesn’t it scale?

By scale I mean that your ROI should be linear: If the first $1,000 generates $10,000 in sales, then the next $1,000 should also generate $10,000 in sales.

The issue is that rarely is your campaign performance evenly distributed. If your drill down deeper into your initial $1000 Campaign, you might see the spend broken down into something like this:

SpendSales%COSROAS
Branded$200$8,0002.5%4000%
Unbranded$800$2,00040%250%
$1000 Campaign$1,000$10,00010%1000%
Majority of the sales are being generated by a small subset of the overall campaign. A classic 80/20 scenario. The performance of the Branded ad set is subsidizing the cost of the unbranded ad set.

The performance of the Branded subset is subsidizing the cost of the Unbranded subset. 80% of your sales are coming from only 20% of the spend, while 80% of your spend is going towards an underperforming segment.

When we try to double the budget to $2,000, here is how the budget gets allocated:

SpendSalesCOSROAS
Branded$200$8,0002.5%4000%
Unbranded$1,800$4,50040%250%
$2,000 Campaign$2,000$12,50016%625%
When budget is doubled, most of the spend goes towards the underperforming segment, resulting in disappointing incremental sales.

With this new data in mind, we should probably:

  1. Decrease budget on the Unbranded segment
  2. Increase budget on the Branded segment

However, it is probably the case that your performing segment is already receiving 100% reach/impressions. So spending more is usually not possible. (In particular for Google Search Ads targeting your branded term: How much you can spend is a function of how many people are searching for your brand. Once you reach everyone, spending more can’t get you more people).

If you want to increase your spend, the only place to do so is in the underperforming unbranded campaign. But at least you’ll have a better expectation of the results.

Summary

  • Avoid making budget decisions on aggregate data. Always try to segment and dig a little deeper.
  • Don’t let underperforming segments ride the coat tails of your top performers. Look for 80/20 campaign and ad group performance and analyze those individually.
  • For Google Search Ads, always separate your Branded search terms and Unbranded search terms into separate campaigns.

By Alex Czartoryski

Alex is the director of digital marketing for Manitobah Mukluks, Canada’s fastest growing footwear brand, where he helps the luxury winter boot manufacturer accelerate growth profitably via digital marketing. Alex has over 20 years experience in e-commerce and digital marketing.

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