Categories
Digital Marketing Google Ads

Essential Google Ads Remarketing Audiences

Below is a list of the Essential Google Audiences the every e-commerce site should create in their Google Ads Account. Even if you don’t plan on using them right away, creating them now will ensure that they can grow so they are ready to be used in the future.

Google’s Built-in Audiences

Before we create our own audiences, we first need to install the Google Ads Dynamic Remarketing Code. This triggers Google to automatically create some built-in Remarketing Audiences:

Audience NameDurationDescription
Shopping cart abandoners30 daysPeople who added products to the shopping cart in the past 30 days but did not complete the purchase
Product Viewers30 daysPeople who viewed specific product pages on your site in the past 30 days but did not create a shopping cart
Past buyer30 daysPeople who purchased products from you in the past 30 days
All visitors30 daysPeople who visited pages that contain your remarketing tags in the past 30 days
All converters180 daysPeople who converted on your site in the last 180 days. Based on your conversion tracking tag. This is not necessarily people who have purchased from you, but anyone who has triggered a “conversion”. (eg: Phone call from an ad)
General Visitors30 daysPeople who visited your website in the past 30 days but did not view any specific products

Additional Audiences

The additional audiences to create follow the same pattern used in Google’s built-in audiences, but with expanded membership durations. The main focus is on Shopping Cart Abandoners, Product Viewers, and Past Buyers.

Shopping Cart Abandoners

Google will have already created a “Shopping cart abandoners” audience with 30 day time window. We will create the following additional audiences for 7, 14, 90, and 180 day durations:

Audience Name:Shopping cart abandoners: xd
“x” will be the duration.
Eg: Shopping cart abandoners: 7d
List Members:Visitors of a page who did not visit another page
Visited page:URL contains cart
Unvisited pageURL contains thank_you
Membership Duration:7, 14, 90, 180 days
* 30 day duration is already created by Google

Past Buyers

Google will have already created a “Past buyers” audience with 30 day time window. We will create these additional audiences for 14, 90, 180, 365, and 520 day durations:

Audience NamePast buyers xd
“x” will be the duration.
Eg: Past buyers: 14d
List MembersVisitors of a page with specific tags
TagsPurchase
Membership duration14, 90, 180, 365, 520 days

Product Viewers

Google will have already created a “Product viewers” audience with a 30 day duration. We will create additional audiences with 14, 90, 180, 365, and 520 day durations.

Audience Name:Product viewers: xd
“x” will be the duration.
Eg: Product Viewers: 14d
List Members:Visitors of a page who did not visit another page
Visited page:URL contains product
Unvisited pageURL contains cart
Membership Duration:14, 90, 180, 365, 520 days
* 30 day duration is already created by Google

General Notes

  • The Membership Durations are somewhat arbitrary. You can get more or less granular, and set your own intervals. It is however best to start with something simple and add granularity later on.
  • A Remarketing Audience needs a minimum of 1,000 members to be eligible to serve. When creating your audience durations, consider how much time it will take to reach 1,000 memebers. eg: How long will it take before your site generates 1,000 abandoned carts, or 1,000 purchases? That will probably be the shortest duration with which you should start.
  • You should generally add all these lists as “Observations” to all your campaigns.

More Reading…

Categories
Attribution Digital Marketing Google Ads

YouTube Video Campaigns are Over-Reporting Conversions

YouTube Video Campaigns count Conversions very differently from other Campaign types

YouTube Video Campaigns count view-conversions as click-conversions, and include them in the “Conversions” columns of Google Ads.

If you are running a ROI focused YouTube Campaign that is targeting a lower funnel Remarketing Audience, the revenue and conversions reported by Google Ads can be over-inflated by 1000% or more vs what Google Analytics will report.

When running a YouTube Campaigns, always:

  1. Be suspicious and skeptical of the conversion data
  2. Adjust your performance targets. Conversions will be overinflated by a factor of up to 1000%, so adjust your performance accordingly.
  3. Use Google Analytics as your measure of YouTube Campaign performance
  4. Avoid Targeting lower funnel Remarketing Lists with YouTube. Save these lists for campaigns that offer true click-based conversion tracking.
  5. Explicitly exclude low funnel Remarketing Lists from your targeting. This will ensure the attribution poaching is limited.

YouTube Conversion Tracking Explained

Standard Campaign Behaviour

For most campaign types, a conversion is only recorded in the “Conversions” column when someone clicks on your ad and then proceeds to make a purchase. This is called a Click-Through Conversion. If there are no clicks on your ad, no conversion is recorded in the Conversions column.

This is the normal expected behaviour.

YouTube Campaign Behaviour

For YouTube campaigns, clicks behave normally: If someone clicks on your ad and then makes a purchase, that purchase is recorded as a conversion as expected. So far so good.

However, if someone DOES NOT CLICK on your ad, but watches your entire ad, and then later purchases, that purchase will be recorded as a conversion and attributed to YouTube.

As per Google:

A ‘view’ is counted when someone watches 30 seconds (or the whole ad if it’s shorter than 30 seconds) or clicks on a part of the ad. A ‘view’ that leads to a conversion is counted in the ‘Conversions’ column. 

Google Ads Help: Understand your conversion tracking data
https://support.google.com/google-ads/answer/6270625

Essentially, these are View-Through Conversions masquerading as Click-Through Conversions. The ad was never clicked, yet a conversion was recorded anyway. Considering that many ads are only 5 seconds long, most ad views are likely being treated as clicks.

This is NOT EXPECTED behaviour!

Attribution Poaching

Attribution Poaching is when one Channel tries to take credit for a sale that was either going to happen anyway, or for a sale that was actually caused by another Channel.

Consider this scenario

You create a YouTube campaign targeting your Shopping Cart Abandoners with a 5 second video ad.

One of your potential customers visits your site, and ads a product to their Shopping Cart. By adding to the Shopping Cart, they are now in your Shopping Cart Abandoners audience, and will be actively targeted by your YouTube Campaign.

They continue to browse your site, but they are interrupted by an e-mail or text from a friend with a link to a funny YouTube video. They click on the link and watch the video. While watching the video, they are forced to watch your 5s video ad (which they ignore). Since they watched y0ur entire ad, Google considers that a “click”.

They then eventually return to your site, to complete the purchase. Or maybe they complete the purchase 3 days later after receiving your Cart Abandonment e-mail.

In either case, your YouTube Campaign will claim credit for the Purchase, and will count it as a Conversion even thought that customer never clicked on your ad.

Why is Google Doing This?

A video view is much more like an impression than like a click, so why are these conversions being lumped in with click-through conversions?

The simple cynical answer is that Goolge makes more more money this way. By counting view-through conversions, the YouTube campaigns will appear to perform much better than they actually do with just click-through conversions (as much as 1000% better). If advertisers think that YouTube is performing 10X better, then they will allocated 10X more budget. The end result is Google makes 10X more money from YouTube.

A “Video View” is more like an Impressions than a Click

Video-View-Conversions should clearly be lumped into the View-Through Conversion column. If Google wants to explicitly report on Video-View-Conversions separately, then they should create another column type. Don’t lump them in with click-through conversions.

Unexpected Behaviour

The problem with all this is that suddenly the “Conversions” column behaves differently in one campaign type vs another. Suddenly the clean click-through conversion data is being polluted with View-Through conversion data. This makes YouTube campaigns appear to perform much better than they should. Which will lead you to incorrectly increase spend.

To make the matter worse…

  1. Many people have long click-through conversion windows. Often 30 days or even longer. This essentially allows a YouTube to claim credit for a conversion that happens 30 days after a video view.
  2. Many video ads are short – only 5s long. Most of these short ads are probably viewed in their entirety, meaning that they are all being counted as clicks. Often the user is forced to watch the entire 5s ad – again a click. This leads to more incorrectly attributed click-conversions.
  3. Often people target video ads using remarketing lists. Often the lowest hanging fruits for video campaigns are Remarketing Audiences. This shows ads to people who know your brand, who have recently visited your site, who may be subscribed to your newsletter, and who may in fact be currently actively shopping on your site. They are all likely to buy from you regardless of the the video ad, but the video ad will take credit for all their purchases.

This could also affect your Display and Discovery Campaigns

This issue could also affect your regular display campaigns and possibly your Discovery campaigns if they are serving ads on the YouTube network.

My recommendation for Display Campaigns is to try and exclude all YouTube placements: Go to: Campaign Settings > Additional Settings > Content Exclusions and select all of the following for exclusion:

  • Live streaming YouTube video
  • Embedded video
  • In-video

Notes:

  • This should only be an issue if you use Google Ads Native Conversion tracking. If you import your conversions directly from Google Analytics, then this should not be an issue (as Analytics only attributes conversions to the last click)
  • If you are running  a pure brand awareness campaign, this is probably less of a concern for you.
  • If you are an Ad Agency getting paid as a % of ad spend, then YouTube campaigns can make you a lot of money.

More Reading

Categories
Digital Marketing Google Ads Shopify

Google Ads Dynamic Remarketing for Shopify

Last Updated: September 25, 2020

STEP 1
Activate Dynamic Remarketing in Google

  1. Go to Google Ads > Tools & Settings > Shared Library > Audience Manager > Audience Sources
  2. Click Set up tag in the “Google Ads tag” card
  3. Remarketing: Choose “Collect data on specific actions…
  4. Business Type: Choose “Retail
  5. Retail Parameters: Select All Parameters
  6. Click Save and continue.
  7. Click on Install Tag Yourself
  8. In the first code box, look for the number at the end of the first line of code and write it down or copy it. This is your Google Conversion Id — you will need it in the next step.
<!-- Global site tag (gtag.js) - Google Ads: 123456789 -->
  1. Click Continue and then Done

STEP 2
Install the Remarketing Code in Theme.liquid

In your store’s admin section go to:

  • Online Store > Themes > Actions > Edit Code
  • Expand the Snippets section and choose Add new snippet
  • Call the snippet “adwords-remarketing
  • Paste the code below into the snippet
  • Enter your google_conversion_id that you obtained in Step 1.8 above.
{% comment %}
Google Ads Dynamic Remarketing Script by Alex Czartoryski
https://business.czarto.com/2017/02/07/shopify-dynamic-remarketing-setup/

This version: Sept 30, 2020
The latest version of this script available here:
https://github.com/Czarto/ShopifyScripts/blob/master/snippets/adwords-remarketing.liquid
{% endcomment %}

{% comment %}Set to false if GTAG is already loaded on the page. Leave to true if unsure.{%endcomment%}
{% assign load_gtag = true %}

{% comment %} Enter your google conversion id below {% endcomment %}
{% assign google_conversion_id = 123456789 %}

{% assign shopify_store_country  = 'US' %}
{% if shop.currency == 'CAD' %}
{% assign shopify_store_country  = 'CA' %}
{% elsif shop.currency == 'AUD' %}
{% assign shopify_store_country  = 'AU' %}
{% endif %}

{%if load_gtag %}
<!-- Global site tag (gtag.js) -->
<script async src="https://www.googletagmanager.com/gtag/js?id=AW-{{ google_conversion_id }}"></script>
{% endif %}
<script>
  window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || [];
  function gtag(){dataLayer.push(arguments);}
  gtag('js', new Date());
  gtag('config', 'AW-{{ google_conversion_id }}');
</script>

{% assign google_event = false %}
{% assign google_items = false %}
{% assign google_value = false %}
{% if template contains 'cart' %}
	{% assign google_event = 'add_to_cart' %}
	{% capture google_items %}{% for item in cart.items %}{'id':'shopify_{{ shopify_store_country  }}_{{ item.product.id }}_{{ item.variant.id }}','google_business_vertical': 'retail'}{% unless forloop.last %}, {% endunless %}{% endfor %}{% endcapture %}
	{% assign google_value = cart.total_price %}
{% elsif template contains 'collection' %}
	{% assign google_event = 'view_item_list' %}
	{% capture google_items %}{% for item in collection.products limit:5 %}{'id':'shopify_{{ shopify_store_country  }}_{{ item.id }}_{{ item.variants.first.id }}','google_business_vertical': 'retail'}{% unless forloop.last %}, {% endunless %}{% endfor %}{% endcapture %}
{% elsif template contains 'product' %}
	{% assign google_event = 'view_item' %}
	{% capture google_items %}{'id':'shopify_{{ shopify_store_country  }}_{{ product.id }}_{{ product.selected_or_first_available_variant.id }}','google_business_vertical': 'retail'}{% endcapture %}
	{% assign google_value = product.selected_or_first_available_variant.price %}
{% elsif template contains 'search' %}
	{% assign google_event = 'view_search_results' %}
	{% capture google_items %}{% for item in search.results limit:5 %}{'id':'shopify_{{ shopify_store_country  }}_{{ item.id }}_{{ item.variants.first.id }}','google_business_vertical': 'retail'}{% unless forloop.last %}, {% endunless %}{% endfor %}{% endcapture %}
{% endif %}

{% if google_event %}
<script>
	gtag('event', '{{ google_event }}', {
	  'send_to': 'AW-{{ google_conversion_id }}',
	  {% if google_value %}'value': '{{ google_value | divided_by: 100.0 }}',{% endif %}
	  'items': [{{ google_items }}]
	});
</script>
{% endif %}

The latest version of this code is available on Github

Add snippet to your Theme file

Open up Layout > theme.liquid and add the following line of code before the closing </head> tag:

{% include 'adwords-remarketing' %}

STEP 3
Install Remarketing in the Checkout Scripts

  • In the very bottom left hand corner the Shopify Admin choose Settings and then Checkout
  • Scroll down to the Additional Scripts section.
  • Copy and paste the code below into the “Additional Scripts” field and update google_conversion_id with your value from step 1.8 as before.
{% comment %}
Google Ads Dynamic Remarkting Script by Alex Czartoryski https://business.czarto.com/

This version: Sep 30, 2020
The latest version of this script available here:
https://github.com/Czarto/ShopifyScripts/blob/master/settings/checkout/adwords-remarketing.liquid
{% endcomment %}

{% comment %}Set to false if GTAG is already loaded on the page. Leave to true if unsure.{%endcomment%}
{% assign load_gtag = true %}

{% if first_time_accessed %}
{% comment %} Enter your account specific values below {% endcomment %}
{% assign google_conversion_id = "123456789" %}

{% assign shopify_store_country  = 'US' %}
{% if shop.currency == 'CAD' %}
{% assign shopify_store_country  = 'CA' %}
{% elsif shop.currency == 'AUD' %}
{% assign shopify_store_country  = 'AU' %}
{% endif %}


{%if load_gtag %}
<!-- Global site tag (gtag.js) -->
<script async src="https://www.googletagmanager.com/gtag/js?id=AW-{{ google_conversion_id }}"></script>
{% endif %}
<script>
  window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || [];
  function gtag(){dataLayer.push(arguments);}
  gtag('js', new Date());
  gtag('config', 'AW-{{ google_conversion_id }}');
</script>

<!-- Event snippet for Web Order conversion page -->
<script>
    // Google Ads Remarketing
    gtag('event', 'purchase', {
	  'send_to': 'AW-{{ google_conversion_id }}',
	  'value': '{{ total_price | divided_by: 100.0 }}',
	  'items': [{% for item in order.line_items %}{'id':'shopify_{{ shopify_store_country }}_{{ item.product.id }}_{{ item.variant.id }}','google_business_vertical': 'retail'}{% unless forloop.last %}, {% endunless %}{% endfor %}]
	});
</script>

{% endif %}

Download the lastest version from Github

STEP 4
Verification

Once you’ve installed all your code, it’s time to run through your main pages (collection, product, cart, and purchase pages) with Google Tag Assistant installed to make sure there are no errors.

Next Steps
Configure your Remarketing Audiences

Now that your store is collecting dynamic remarketing data, the next step is to properly organize and segment your visitors into Purchasers, Cart Abandoners and Product Viewers. This is covered in the next post about Google Ads Remarketing Audiences.

Additional Reading…

Categories
Digital Marketing Google Ads

Google Ads Remarketing Campaign Structure

Remarketing Theory

  1. The deeper a user is in your sales funnel, the more likely he is to buy. A shopping cart abandoner is more likely to buy than a product browser who is more likely to buy than someone who briefly visited your homepage.
  2. The more recent the user’s visit, the more likely he is to buy. A user who visited your site yesterday is more likely to buy than a user who visited your site 10 days ago.
  3. The more likely a user is to buy, the more you want to bid on that user.

Audiences

Please read the post Essential Google Ads Remarketing Audiences and follow the instructions to create your remarketing audiences.

Campaign Setup

Create one campaign per major market you are targeting, and give them a descriptive name:

  • USA: Display Remarketing
  • Canada: Display Remarketing

Generally, but not always, you will want a separate campaign for every unique currency and language you are targeting.

Core Ad Groups

1. Cart Abandoners

This ad group will target cart abandoners: Visitors who added a product to their cart but never purchased. Dynamic Product ads perform particularly well with cart abandonment, as your visitors are shown the exact products that they added to their cart.

Audiences:

  • Cart Abandoners – 7 day
  • Cart Abandoners – 14 day
  • Cart Abandoners – 30 day
  • Cart Abandoners – 90 day
  • Cart Abandoners – 180 day

2. Product Viewers

This ad group will target users who visited a product details page but who never added a product to their cart.

Audiences:

  • Product Viewers – 14 day
  • Product Viewers – 30 day
  • Product Viewers – 90 day
  • Product Viewers – 180 day
  • Product Viewers – 365 day
  • Product Viewers – 520 day

3. Past Buyers

This ad group will show ads to people who have previously purchased. This is a good place to push micro conversions such as joining a loyalty program, joining a community, new product launches or related product up-selling.

Audiences

  • Past Buyers 14 days
  • Past Buyers 30 days
  • Past Buyers 90 days
  • Past Buyers 365 days
  • Past Buyers 520 days

Other Tips

Exclude Mobile App Placements

Exclude placements where users are unlikely to interact with your ad, or where they may accidentally click your ad, such as in mobile apps and games.

To exclude mobile apps, go to your ad group and then select:

  • Placements > Exclusions tab > Exclude placements
  • App Categories > Expand All App Categories, and exclude all app categories individually
  • Repeat for all your display ad groups

Exclude YouTube Placements

YouTube tracks View Through Conversions as if they were Click Through Conversions. This leads to attribution poaching, and makes your display campaigns appear to perform much better than they actually do. This ultimately causes you to increase bids and budgets, and overspend.

To exclude YouTube placements, go to: Campaign Settings > Additional Settings > Content Exclusions and select all of the following for exclusion:

  • Live streaming YouTube video
  • Embedded video
  • In-video

Exclude GMail Placements

Gmail “clicks” don’t necessarily result in a visit to your site, and usually only represent the expansion of your ad. This can lead to attribution poaching, in particular if you have a newsletter that you send our regularly.

To exclude gmail placements, go to Placements > Exclusions and exclude mail.google.com

A word about View Through Conversions

View Through Conversions are conversions where a display ad appeared on the screen, was NOT clicked, but the user ended up purchasing on your site sometime later. In general I recommend that everyone IGNORE View Through Conversions, in particular in remarketing campaigns.

What usually happens, is that an ad is displayed on screen, the visitor may not even see it, but clicks instead on a cart-abandonment e-mail and makes the purchase. AdWords will credit that conversion to the view through.

The one exception is for “brand unaware” customers. These are customers that have never visited your website before. If such a customer sees you ad, and purchases, then the odds are better that it was a result of your ad.

In an ideal world, there would be a simple way to test the value of your view-through-conversions, as they are different for every segment, and every business.

Other Resources

Categories
Analytics Digital Marketing Google Ads

Why doesn’t my Ad Spend Scale?

Consider this Scenario:

You spend $1,000 on a new Ad Campaign that generates $10,000 in revenue. “That’s a great ROI” you tell yourself, “Let’s double the spend!“.

When you double the budget to $2,000, your Campaign only generates $12,500 in total sales and not the $20,000 you were expecting. Why?

SpendSalesCost of SalesROAS
Ad Campaign #1$1,000$10,00010%1000%
Ad Campaign #2$2,000$12,50016%625%
Increasing spend by $1,000 only resulted in $2,500 in additional revenue: An incremental cost of sales of 40% and an incremental ROAS of 250%

Why doesn’t it scale?

By scale I mean that your ROI should be linear: If the first $1,000 generates $10,000 in sales, then the next $1,000 should also generate $10,000 in sales.

The issue is that rarely is your campaign performance evenly distributed. If your drill down deeper into your initial $1000 Campaign, you might see the spend broken down into something like this:

SpendSales%COSROAS
Branded$200$8,0002.5%4000%
Unbranded$800$2,00040%250%
$1000 Campaign$1,000$10,00010%1000%
Majority of the sales are being generated by a small subset of the overall campaign. A classic 80/20 scenario. The performance of the Branded ad set is subsidizing the cost of the unbranded ad set.

The performance of the Branded subset is subsidizing the cost of the Unbranded subset. 80% of your sales are coming from only 20% of the spend, while 80% of your spend is going towards an underperforming segment.

When we try to double the budget to $2,000, here is how the budget gets allocated:

SpendSalesCOSROAS
Branded$200$8,0002.5%4000%
Unbranded$1,800$4,50040%250%
$2,000 Campaign$2,000$12,50016%625%
When budget is doubled, most of the spend goes towards the underperforming segment, resulting in disappointing incremental sales.

With this new data in mind, we should probably:

  1. Decrease budget on the Unbranded segment
  2. Increase budget on the Branded segment

However, it is probably the case that your performing segment is already receiving 100% reach/impressions. So spending more is usually not possible. (In particular for Google Search Ads targeting your branded term: How much you can spend is a function of how many people are searching for your brand. Once you reach everyone, spending more can’t get you more people).

If you want to increase your spend, the only place to do so is in the underperforming unbranded campaign. But at least you’ll have a better expectation of the results.

Summary

  • Avoid making budget decisions on aggregate data. Always try to segment and dig a little deeper.
  • Don’t let underperforming segments ride the coat tails of your top performers. Look for 80/20 campaign and ad group performance and analyze those individually.
  • For Google Search Ads, always separate your Branded search terms and Unbranded search terms into separate campaigns.
Categories
Digital Marketing Google Ads Shopify Shopping

Add Microdata to your Shopify Product Pages (with variant support)

If you are using Google Merchant Center to with Shopify then you have likely ran into an issue where Merchant Center will give you a warning that there is insufficient match of micro-data information and that automatic item updates are no longer being performed.

merchant-center-warning
Insufficient micro-data warnings in Google Merchant Center

This is generally due to incorrect or incomplete micro-data on your product page.

Product.liquid

All the required edits should be limited to your Product.liquid file. You need to define a Product itemscope which will have properties such as Product Url, Product Image, Product Title, and Product Description.

Nested within the Product will be an Offer itemscope that will contain the product variant’s price, currency, condition, and availability.

What complicates things is that most Shopify Themes will have at least a partial implementation of micro-data, and are perhaps only missing a few items, or perhaps don’t fully support variants.

A good idea would be to first run your product page through Google’s Structured Data Testing Tool to see which tags already exist.

Product ItemScope

1. Open your product.liquid file and add the Product itemscope property to the outer most div. The first line of your product.liquid should look something like this: 

<div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Product">

2. Directly below this line, you should add the product variant’s url and image markup as so:

<meta itemprop="url" content="{{ shop.url }}{{ product.selected_or_first_available_variant.url }}" />
<meta itemprop="image" content="https:{{ product.selected_or_first_available_variant.image.src | product_img_url: 'grande' }}" />

3. Find where your product’s title and description are displayed, and add itemprop=name and itemprop=description attributes as shown below:

<!-- Product Title -->
<h1 itemprop="name">{{ product.title }}</h1>
<!-- Product description -->
<div class="product-description" itemprop="description">
{{ product.description }}
</div>

Offer ItemScope

4. Now you need to find the place in your product.liquid file where you display your price. Find a wrapping div tag and add the Offers itemscope attributes to the tag. The Offers itemscope MUST nested within the Product itemscope div tag.

<div itemprop="offers" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Offer">

5. Immediately after this line you can add the product variant’s price, currency, condition, and availability microdata as so:

<meta itemprop="priceCurrency" content="{{ shop.currency }}" />
<meta itemprop="price" content="{{ product.selected_or_first_available_variant.price | money_without_currency | remove: ',' }}" />
<meta itemprop="itemCondition" itemtype="http://schema.org/OfferItemCondition" content="http://schema.org/NewCondition"/>
{% if product.selected_or_first_available_variant.available %}
  <link itemprop="availability" href="http://schema.org/InStock" />
{% else %}
  <link itemprop="availability" href="http://schema.org/OutOfStock" />
{% endif %}

Putting it all together

Once done, your product.liquid should have roughly the following structure.

<!-- BEGIN Product itemscope -->
<div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Product">
  <meta itemprop="url" content="{{ shop.url }}{{ product.selected_or_first_available_variant.url }}" />
  <meta itemprop="image" content="https:{{ product.selected_or_first_available_variant.image.src | product_img_url: 'grande' }}" />
 
  <!-- Product Title & Description -->
  <h1 itemprop="name">{{ product.title }}</h1>
  <div class="product-description" itemprop="description">
  {{ product.description }}</div>
  <!-- BEGIN Offer itemscope -->
  <div itemprop="offers" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Offer">
    <meta itemprop="priceCurrency" content="{{ shop.currency }}" />
    <meta itemprop="price" content="{{ product.selected_or_first_available_variant.price | money_without_currency | remove: ',' }}" />
    <meta itemprop="itemCondition" itemtype="http://schema.org/OfferItemCondition" content="http://schema.org/NewCondition"/>
    {% if product.selected_or_first_available_variant.available %}
      <link itemprop="availability" href="http://schema.org/InStock" />
    {% else %}
      <link itemprop="availability" href="http://schema.org/OutOfStock" />
    {% endif %}
  </div>
</div>

Final Steps

  1. Save and test your new product page in Google’s Structured Data Testing Tool, and fix all errors if any.
  2. Wait and check back periodically in Google Merchant center to ensure no new errors were introduced. It will take a few weeks before the “unable to update” warning disappears.

Related Reading