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Attribution Digital Marketing eCommerce Google Ads Shopify

Optimizing Shopify’s Google Ads Conversion Tracking

Here are some essential changes to make to your Google Ads conversion tracking after you connect Shopify’s Google Shopping Channel.

STEP 0
Install the Google Shopping Channel

This guide assumes that you have the Google Shopping Channel installed on your Shopify store. If this is not the case, then:

  1. Install the Google Shopping Channel
  2. Connect your Google Account (must be an account that has access to both Google Merchant Center and Google Ads)
  3. Connect your Google Ads Account in the “Smart Shopping campaign” section

STEP 1
Remove Old Conversion Tracking Code

By connecting Shopify to Google Ads via the Google Shopping Channel, Shopify will begin sending conversion data to your Google Ads account. If you were already tracking conversions in Google Ads, then you need to make sure you are not duplicating your conversion data:

  • If you previously had a Google Ads conversion tracking script installed in your checkout, then remove that code.
  • If you were importing conversions from Google Analytics, stop importing those conversions.

STEP 2
Fix Conversion Categories

Log into Google Ads and then Go to
Tools & Settings > Measurement > Conversions

You should see a bunch of new conversion actions created by Shopify. You will also see a warning that your conversion categories are out of date, and that you should update 4 of your conversions actions.

Click Update Now and update the settings to the following:

STEP 3
Conversion Windows and Attribution Models

Although Shopify created multiple conversion actions, you only need to worry about the Google Shopping App Purchase conversion event.

Click on the Google Shopping App Purchase conversion action and update the following settings:

Old ValueNew Value
CountEvery ConversionOne
View-through Conversion Window30 days1 day
Attribution ModelLast clickLinear

One Conversion per click

If you count “Every Conversion” you increases the risk of double attribution across your various channels.

For example: A user clicks on your Google ad and makes a purchase. It makes sense to count and attribute this conversion to Google Ads. If this same user later receives your newsletter, and purchases again, then you probably want to attribute that sale to the Newsletter and NOT to Google. Setting conversion count to “One” instead of “Every” ensures that only the first sale gets attributed to google, and not the second.

Counting “Every” conversion increases the risk of double attribution

Click-Through Conversions

Arguably, you should set your Click-Through Conversion window to 30 days. 90 days seems extremely long, and could increases your chances of double attribution across multiple sales channels.

However, if you are using Smart Campaigns or Smart Bidding, the bidding algorithm can only take into account conversions that have occurred within the specified conversion window. So theoretically, the longer your conversion window, the more data for Smart Bidding to optimize with. So the 90 day click-conversion window can probably stay.

View-Through Conversions

Set the View-Through Conversion window to only 1 day. A longer View-Through conversion window is dangerous, and will lead to over attributing sales to Display Remarketing, YouTube, and Smart Shopping. This will invariably cause you to overspend on those campaigns.

A View-Through conversion window greater than 1 day is dangerous, and will lead to over attributing sales to undeserving channels.

Which Attribution Model to use?

Linear, Time Decay, Position Based, or Data Driven are all better than First or Last click, as they allow you to attribute sales across a wider range of ad interactions, which allows you to spend more evenly across your entire funnel.

I personally usually choose Linear or Position Based, as I like pushing more attribution (and therefore spend) into the top part of the funnel.

Further Reading